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redwatch

Super Macro Photography

47 posts in this topic

just got my reversing ring! great new dimension to my photography for a whopping $5!

a few things i dont like about the reversing ring. it exposes the rear element of the lens to the naked world, and now has some nice dust living inside of it.

technically: I obviously cant adjust the aperture, this leads to an insanely narrow depth of field, when i breath my focal point changes even slightly, but enough to effect the focus of my subject. Solution? I can either buy a manual aperture adjustment lens, get a real macro lens, get some tubes, or maybe try setting the aperture on the lens when its connected proper, then turning off the camera and reversing it making the assumption it might stay at f/11 or whatever i set it to, anyone try this, will this work?

regardless this new toy is a good starting point without dropping some serious $$

PIC included, focal point was on 'swiss made' the rest is out of focal range, taken handheld

post-10838-127060346889_thumb.jpg

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Very nice!!! For the exposed rear elements, I don't know about Canon, but Nikon makes an adapter that you mount to the back of the lens that allows you to mount a 52mm Filter to it so you can keep it dust free.

Nice find for $5! :thumbsupsmileyanim:

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With regards to the aperture, unfortunately that won't work. The aperture ring is closed by a small little lever by the camera itself. Once the lens is removed, it closes right down to the smallest setting. A manual lens is difficult as well. Without the lens being mounted to the camera body, the lens stays fully stopped down. You can hold the lever on a manual lens to the preset f-stop though, or, again, Nikon makes an adapter ring that has a stop down lever. You set the aperture, move the lever to fully open the lens so you can focus and meter, and then when you are ready to take the picture, you move the lever and it stops down the lens to the preset setting. Not sure, but Canon must make something similar to this. The Nikon adapters are the BR-4 or BR-6. Pics are in the beginning of the thread

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If you have a lens with an aperture ring there is no problem at all (with either system).

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I stand corrected. Philosopher is correct. A manual lens WILL stay at its set aperture when reversed. The BR-4 and BR-6 are handy though as they keep the lens fully opened to make it easier to focus, and then you can stop it down to the set aperture.

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might just get some tubes with AF connect for $80

or con my gf into buying me the 2.8f 100m macro lens, hah ;)

for $5 I lost nothing and had some fun, cant stand the dust building up on the element tho

tripod shot with reverse ring

post-10838-127066453525_thumb.jpg

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Wow, now this is serious!!! Simply fantastic :thumbsupsmileyanim:

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Wow, now this is serious!!! Simply fantastic :thumbsupsmileyanim:

+1. Great reading.........

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Some new shots. Used my Tamron 90mm as I didn't have my tripod with me for the bellows. Found this little critter outside the entrance to my office.

PrayingMantis1.jpg

PrayingMantis2.jpg

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Sick thread S, what an insane shot of the critter!!! :shock:

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Yadda yadda

1 Sees subject

2 Takes diminutive Canon IXUS 100is out of shirt pocket

3 Switch on (in pre set 'D - Macro mode' which allows full zoom focus in macro)

4 Hand held PnS...click

5 Resize to 1024 x 768

IMG_1906a.jpg

;)

.

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ID: 37   Posted (edited)

Unfortunately, with the Nikon system, metering does not work at all. You cannot set the D40 to aperture priority when the lens is reversed. The camera complains and the screen displays a warning indicating that there is no lens attached. You can only set the camera to full manual to get it to work.

There is a work around - but I haven't gotten to that part yet biggrin.gif

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008MBDWV8/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

or

 

I got the solution!!!!! there is a small spring loaded mechanism at the camera side of your lens. Just pull it so that the aperture gets wide open and then stuff a small piece of paper in the gap so that the aperture remains open. and viola......you get crystal clear pics with aperture wide open. It helped me. Hope it helps you.

Edited by kevin300z

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Holy crap that's a ling lens (that's what she said lol) is that iwc dial the damaged gen that was on eBay a few months back?

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Yadda yadda

1 Sees subject

2 Takes diminutive Canon IXUS 100is out of shirt pocket

3 Switch on (in pre set 'D - Macro mode' which allows full zoom focus in macro)

4 Hand held PnS...click

5 Resize to 1024 x 768

wink.gif

.

 

Would have been nice to see it in focus though ;)

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Got my new extension tube.
 
dsc0490wz.jpg
1 person likes this

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Looks great.  Nice job!

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Great article, exactly what i was after.
Cant wait to try some macro shots out, especially some snow flake and insect ones :)

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I got a sigma 105mm. It's 1:1. Never really used it for watches though. I struggle to find a nice composition! Any tips?

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Just try different angles - take what looks good from not 1:1 and apply that same process to getting close.

 

An assortment of lens reversal stuff.

Reversed 20mm

Rev20_0001.jpg

 

Reversed 24mm

Rev24_0001.jpg

Rev24_0003.jpg

 

Reversed 50mm

Rev50_0003.jpg

Rev50_0053.jpg

Rev50_0057.jpg

Rev50_0067.jpg

Rev50_0076.jpg

Rev50_0085.jpg

 

Some eyes

Eyes_Iris_0003.jpg

Eyes_Lorena_0001.jpg

Eyes_Lorena_0003.jpg

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Or how about a Ricoh wg-4. It has a built-in LED ring permanent light/flash and can handle macros within a distance of 1cm. Total cost roughly 175€. Water proof (+10m) and shock resistant (2m fall), too...

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