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Hey guys 

 
I started with a 16200 build. I ordered the following components

 

- raffles 2836-2 case

- gen 16200 silver dial 

- arf crown and tube 

- gen caseback 

- tudor 2824-2 hands 

- Asian 2836-2 because of the movement height

- raffles braclet 
- raffles 3135 dwo 

 

this is my first official build 

i have worked on cartel watches before but never datejust. Are there people with the same build? if so give me some advice i have all the tools and will upload photos when everything is in


here Some pictures of the dial 

B84D0879-6F04-4467-B754-F1C3A72A9066.jpeg

8B7F7B06-FF85-4ABA-8210-87FD06B9FB99.jpeg

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With a rafflesdial case it comes with the crown and tube so I see no point in installing another rep crown and tube. It also comes with a case back- I don't know if a gen case back will even fit, but what's the point?

With a gen dial, first you have to cut the dial feet off flush.

Next you can remove the day wheel and install the DWO- that's the tricky part- getting it aligned correctly.

Glue the dial to the movement ring and then install the hands.

Install the crown to the movement stem- you'll need to get the stem to right length- not too long or too short

The rafflesdials case should come with a spacer ring. Remove the stem and crown and install the movement/dial with the spacer ring. With some movement tabs and screws you screw down the movement inside the case so it doesn't move around.

Install the stem and crown. Make sure there's not dust in the case and put the case back on.

Assuming it all checks out, you can install the bracelet and enjoy you new watch.

 

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"Install the crown to the movement stem- you'll need to get the stem to right length- not too long or too short."

 

Good advice.

 

I have to 'fess up.

I admit to cutting quite a few stems too short over the years...but there is a quickie fix if it is not cut too short.  If the stem is 1mm or so too short, you can stuff some solid core solder chips (not acid core) in the crown tube where the stem screws in to add length to the assembly.  I would not call this a 'botch job' but more like an emergency fix...many pro repair guys do this trick but since it does not show, most will not say anything about it.  You can cut slivers of solder off the roll with a razor blade.

You can remove the solder with a small drill bit in a pin vise if needed later on but some usually stays in the threads and can cause the stem to get in a bind...but there is a fix for that too:  Cut a tiny notch longways in the end of a spare stem and run it in and out a few times to clean the solder out of the threads like a thread tap does.

 

The 'short stem' fix will always depend on the crown tube having enough threads to begin with, about one and a half or two turns is probably the minimum after the fix.

'Crown tube' = the little threaded tube sticking out of the crown, not to be confused with the case tube.

 

If the stem is too long it can bind the crown when screwed down and could damage the main plate or slide the movement\dial over to one side.  On glued on dials it can break the dial away from the calendar spacer etc if there is enough room for the movement to slide over.  If there is enough room between the movement/movement spacer and case, the movement could slide over far enough to jam the hour wheel hub against the dial hole and stop the watch.  All kinds of little mishaps can occur and many are hard to spot.

 

Something else...be sure there is enough room between the case tube threads and the crown when unscrewed to allow the crown to 'declutch' when it is pushed in to start the threads.  Otherwise the crown will be winding the watch when screwing the crown down making it hard to start, hard to turn, plus putting spring pressure on the stem pilot when it turns.  The pilot is small and is not designed to turn under pressure.  This can also wear the seating surface on the main plate.  This is also why you should not push the crown in toward the case when manually winding watches. 

Pilot = the sharp point on the stem.

 

I know all this is boring but it is better to know about it now than when something goes wrong and you have to start looking for the cause.   :hammer:

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On 12/30/2019 at 9:59 PM, alligoat said:

With a rafflesdial case it comes with the crown and tube so I see no point in installing another rep crown and tube. It also comes with a case back- I don't know if a gen case back will even fit, but what's the point?

With a gen dial, first you have to cut the dial feet off flush.

Next you can remove the day wheel and install the DWO- that's the tricky part- getting it aligned correctly.

Glue the dial to the movement ring and then install the hands.

Install the crown to the movement stem- you'll need to get the stem to right length- not too long or too short

The rafflesdials case should come with a spacer ring. Remove the stem and crown and install the movement/dial with the spacer ring. With some movement tabs and screws you screw down the movement inside the case so it doesn't move around.

Install the stem and crown. Make sure there's not dust in the case and put the case back on.

Assuming it all checks out, you can install the bracelet and enjoy you new watch.

 

Hey thanks for your advice

The crown is not gen spec and caseback also 😁

On 12/31/2019 at 1:12 AM, automatico said:

"Install the crown to the movement stem- you'll need to get the stem to right length- not too long or too short."

 

Good advice.

 

I have to 'fess up.

I admit to cutting quite a few stems too short over the years...but there is a quickie fix if it is not cut too short.  If the stem is 1mm or so too short, you can stuff some solid core solder chips (not acid core) in the crown tube where the stem screws in to add length to the assembly.  I would not call this a 'botch job' but more like an emergency fix...many pro repair guys do this trick but since it does not show, most will not say anything about it.  You can cut slivers of solder off the roll with a razor blade.

You can remove the solder with a small drill bit in a pin vise if needed later on but some usually stays in the threads and can cause the stem to get in a bind...but there is a fix for that too:  Cut a tiny notch longways in the end of a spare stem and run it in and out a few times to clean the solder out of the threads like a thread tap does.

 

The 'short stem' fix will always depend on the crown tube having enough threads to begin with, about one and a half or two turns is probably the minimum after the fix.

'Crown tube' = the little threaded tube sticking out of the crown, not to be confused with the case tube.

 

If the stem is too long it can bind the crown when screwed down and could damage the main plate or slide the movement\dial over to one side.  On glued on dials it can break the dial away from the calendar spacer etc if there is enough room for the movement to slide over.  If there is enough room between the movement/movement spacer and case, the movement could slide over far enough to jam the hour wheel hub against the dial hole and stop the watch.  All kinds of little mishaps can occur and many are hard to spot.

 

Something else...be sure there is enough room between the case tube threads and the crown when unscrewed to allow the crown to 'declutch' when it is pushed in to start the threads.  Otherwise the crown will be winding the watch when screwing the crown down making it hard to start, hard to turn, plus putting spring pressure on the stem pilot when it turns.  The pilot is small and is not designed to turn under pressure.  This can also wear the seating surface on the main plate.  This is also why you should not push the crown in toward the case when manually winding watches. 

Pilot = the sharp point on the stem.

 

I know all this is boring but it is better to know about it now than when something goes wrong and you have to start looking for the cause.   :hammer:

Hey 

I have replaced some stems 

I first mounted the crown on the stem then I put it in the movement then I measured the distance from the end of the tube to the crown all the way in that distance I then cut the stem and always went well
 

i hope this is the correct way 

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"have replaced some stems.  I first mounted the crown on the stem then I put it in the movement then I measured the distance from the end of the tube to the crown all the way in that distance, I then cut the stem and always went well.  i hope this is the correct way."

 

Yes your method works fine.  

Some screw down crowns can cause trouble and the part about the crown 'declutching' is fairly important and much of the reason for my windy reply. 

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Very nice! OP, what is the total cost for the build? If you dont mind sharing. I have build 16233 with the roman irovy dial and it cost me almost a gen price! Considering most of the materials are gen, ie gen bezel, crown, crystal, hands, dial, crown tube. Reshape JMB case, MMM 18k gold over lay vintage bracelet. 16200 raffle caseback, VR3135 serviced, Rolex replacement Date-Wheel. Gen 3135-130 (winding bridge), gen 3135-140( complete auto wind). Total cost is more than $2000, I do not remember the specific number, but, it is very darn close to a gen price! Lol.


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"Very nice! OP, what is the total cost for the build? If you dont mind sharing. I have build 16233 with the roman irovy dial and it cost me almost a gen price! Considering most of the materials are gen, ie gen bezel, crown, crystal, hands, dial, crown tube."

 

I sold an all original 16233 in about 80/85% condition April 2019 for $2800 to a watch trader...the last remaining quick set rlx.  No more modern rlx for me unless a real bargain falls my way.  I paid $1000 for it January 2008 and never wore the watch.  At $2800 there was $200 to $500 profit left in it for the next guy.  I see them priced for $3500 and up on eBay but it can be a den of crooks and you might never see your $$ or the watch again.  Besides that, someone can swap rusty/worn out parts from their watch to your watch and return the watch for some reason, maybe claiming it was rusty/worn out when they got it.  It would be very, very hard to prove what happened and the seller almost always loses these cases.  After the fees (if everything went Ok) you still need to sell the same watch for $3000+ to get $2800 on eBay.

 

I figure it would cost $1500 to $2000 to put a tt sapphire dj together now with swiss eta, aftmkt case, used gold bezel and dial, aftmkt ss/14k bracelet etc. 

You can use a genuine or aftmkt 3135 date disc for a DWO on eta projects as the 3135 date turns the right way for an eta but you can not use a date disc made for a rlx 15xx or 3035 on an eta 28xx. 

You will need to trim the teeth out of the inside of the 3135 date disc. 

In reality, having $1500 or $2000 in a tutone swisseta DJ with solid gold bez/mid links is not too bad if you wear it 5 or 7 years.  Compare that to RWC's $900+ fee plus parts to fix a genuine watch if it needs service, is dropped, or gets wet inside.

Drop an eta 28xx and it is usually Ok.  Otoh I pressed a rotor weight back on the bearing (swisseta 2836) last week from a drop of about 4 feet onto a hard tile floor and that was all it needed.  Modern rlx might not be as rugged.

 

Why no more rlx QS?

Because of the parts situation and absurd watch/parts prices.  No genuine rlx for me unless they are about 35 or 40 cents on the dollar of the current selling price.  Bought a 90% 14000M for $1000 (no b/p) a while back but imho I paid too much.  Tried to get it for $800 but no go.

Imho 90% = full length bracelet with no bracelet screws damaged by r/r, no scratches deeper than hairline, no crystal chips etc...basically looks new on the arm...or lower leg.  :pimp:

 

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8 hours ago, automatico said:

"Very nice! OP, what is the total cost for the build? If you dont mind sharing. I have build 16233 with the roman irovy dial and it cost me almost a gen price! Considering most of the materials are gen, ie gen bezel, crown, crystal, hands, dial, crown tube."

 

I sold an all original 16233 in about 80/85% condition April 2019 for $2800 to a watch trader...the last remaining quick set rlx.  No more modern rlx for me unless a real bargain falls my way.  I paid $1000 for it January 2008 and never wore the watch.  At $2800 there was $200 to $500 profit left in it for the next guy.  I see them priced for $3500 and up on eBay but it can be a den of crooks and you might never see your $$ or the watch again.  Besides that, someone can swap rusty/worn out parts from their watch to your watch and return the watch for some reason, maybe claiming it was rusty/worn out when they got it.  It would be very, very hard to prove what happened and the seller almost always loses these cases.  After the fees (if everything went Ok) you still need to sell the same watch for $3000+ to get $2800 on eBay.

 

I figure it would cost $1500 to $2000 to put a tt sapphire dj together now with swiss eta, aftmkt case, used gold bezel and dial, aftmkt ss/14k bracelet etc. 

You can use a genuine or aftmkt 3135 date disc for a DWO on eta projects as the 3135 date turns the right way for an eta but you can not use a date disc made for a rlx 15xx or 3035 on an eta 28xx. 

You will need to trim the teeth out of the inside of the 3135 date disc. 

In reality, having $1500 or $2000 in a tutone swisseta DJ with solid gold bez/mid links is not too bad if you wear it 5 or 7 years.  Compare that to RWC's $900+ fee plus parts to fix a genuine watch if it needs service, is dropped, or gets wet inside.

Drop an eta 28xx and it is usually Ok.  Otoh I pressed a rotor weight back on the bearing (swisseta 2836) last week from a drop of about 4 feet onto a hard tile floor and that was all it needed.  Modern rlx might not be as rugged.

 

Why no more rlx QS?

Because of the parts situation and absurd watch/parts prices.  No genuine rlx for me unless they are about 35 or 40 cents on the dollar of the current selling price.  Bought a 90% 14000M for $1000 (no b/p) a while back but imho I paid too much.  Tried to get it for $800 but no go.

Imho 90% = full length bracelet with no bracelet screws damaged by r/r, no scratches deeper than hairline, no crystal chips etc...basically looks new on the arm...or lower leg.  :pimp:

 

 Nice! Yeah, the newer DJ 41 is too big for my small wrist, and I love vintage watches. They are the unique watches you can find, and probably the best! I don't care if people said they out-dated! The newer model just not quite as good as the old one. Here is the picture of my watch:

 

 

IMG-7615.jpg

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On 1/4/2020 at 8:06 AM, beanvatan said:

Very nice! OP, what is the total cost for the build? If you dont mind sharing. I have build 16233 with the roman irovy dial and it cost me almost a gen price! Considering most of the materials are gen, ie gen bezel, crown, crystal, hands, dial, crown tube. Reshape JMB case, MMM 18k gold over lay vintage bracelet. 16200 raffle caseback, VR3135 serviced, Rolex replacement Date-Wheel. Gen 3135-130 (winding bridge), gen 3135-140( complete auto wind). Total cost is more than $2000, I do not remember the specific number, but, it is very darn close to a gen price! Lol.


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16233 Nice!  That would be the next build I think 

the total cost is around $325 so it’s a cheapie :) nice beater I think

i will upgrade it with a gen 2836-2 in the future 

Just now, Thevintagecrown said:

16233 Nice!  That would be the next build I think 

the total cost is around $325 so it’s a cheapie :) nice beater I think

i will upgrade it with a gen 2836-2 in the future 

 

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On 12/29/2019 at 6:00 PM, Thevintagecrown said:

raffles braclet 
- raffles 3135 dwo 

That's Awesome! I emailed raffles but have not heard anything back from them. Did you have any luck? Price is not a matter when it comes to building, to me, at least. Because we want the best out of our money, even though $300 is considered a cheapie, but it's a decent to good build. Compare to TD's reps with flaws for the same price! LOL.  I agree that the more money we spend on these, the more gen-like it gets. But, you know, the reason to buy, build and mod reps are to enjoy the beauty of the watch. Furthermore, it is to learn about the piece as well as the hobby. And at the end of the day is to be able to look at the piece with a smile. 

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Hey I am planning on building a similar Franken, however I am still unsure whether to use a raffles 2824 or 2836 case as base. I've read the crown position is too low on the 2836. Is that true? On their website the crown position looks to be the same.

Are there other advantages or disadvantages to each movement, e. g. when fitting a DWO or a gen DW? Do I have to worry about alignment of the date window with either of the cases, movements or datewheels?

 

Currently I am considering ordering the following things:

- rafflesdials DJ36 smooth bezel case

- rafflesdials silver lumed DJ36 handset

- rafflesdials vintage hollow end link 20mm jubilee for DJ36

- Swiss ETA

- gen blue sunburst DJ36 dial with lumed stick indices glued on .74mm dial feet from CousinsUK (item nr. D38748)

- gen 3135 DW, rafflesdials ETA DWO or a BP v2 DW whatever works best?

- gen 6mm crown

 

For any advice I should be very thankful.

 

p.s. I am entirely new to this, I don't even have any tools

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rafflesdials DJ36 smooth bezel case 

I am still unsure whether to use a raffles 2824 or 2836 case as base.

 

If you go with the 2836 case and 2836 movement you will have a taller canon pinion/hour wheel for more hand clearance.  You will also have the instant date change like a genuine rlx where the 2824 is gradual date change...plus you have more room for a date wheel overlay.  The 2824 makes these conversions a little bit harder imho.  Removing the unwanted 2836 day of the week parts is easy to do.

There is not much if any outside spec difference between a lot of aftmkt 2836 and 2824 cases because many of the cases are the same except for interior machining. 

 

Swiss ETA

 

Good choice...imho most Asian eta clones are junk.

 

rafflesdials silver lumed DJ36 handset

rafflesdials vintage hollow end link 20mm jubilee for DJ36

gen blue sunburst DJ36 dial with lumed stick indices 

glued on .74mm dial feet from CousinsUK (item nr. D38748)

gen 3135 DW, rafflesdials ETA DWO or a BP v2 DW whatever works best?

gen 6mm crown

 

Good choices.

Might go with a genspec high quality aftmkt case tube.

I've had hit or miss luck with glue on platform dial feet because they break off at the glue joint if there is much slack between the spacer, movement, and case.  I have tried all kinds of methods to mount 'no foot' dials to Eta movements and the key is a closely fitting metal movement spacer and case clamps/screws that put downward pressure on the movement.  Platform dial feet are usually Ok if the movement/dial combo is securely mounted.

A genuine or genuine spec aftmkt rolex 3135 date wheel can be used for a DWO on Eta 2836 projects.  DW for rlx 15xx and 3035 will not work.  You may need to remove the teeth on the inside of the genspec DW by sanding them away.

DWO made for Etas can be first rate or junk, it's a gamble.  Most aftmkt DW for 3135 are pretty good but it is still a gamble.

 

If you have a good case, good swisseta movement, and careful assembly,  a watch like this should go 5 to 8 years with no trouble at all.  Then c/o, gaskets etc and go again.

 

 

 

 

 

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@automatico First of all, thank you very much for your answer! I will go with an ETA 2836-2 then.

 

I've found a Swiss ETA 2836-2 on Ebay for 98€, however it says it has been in storage for 10 years and would require a cleaning. My watchmaker offered me to clean and regulate it for 100€. Would that be a good deal, or would it make more sense to buy a new (pre-sealed) one on CousinsUK for 250€ and mount it without cleaning or regulating it?

 

A case tube is where the crown screws into right? I didn't even know those were removable... do you think a gen crown might not fit on the raffles dials case tube, or is it only about the quality?

 

Do you mean that the dial does not have to be glued at all, if the spacer and case clamps are closely fitting or do you mean that the glued feet are more likely not to break in that case?

 

Thanks again and have a great day :)

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p.s. Why do you think it might be necessary to remove the teeth from the gen datewheel? Shouln't there be enough clearance after removing the day wheel on the inside?

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And more thing that makes me worry: The gen dials that I had in mind are 27,8 mm in diameter according to the seller, whereas the raffle dials case is fit for 28,0 mm dials as sold by them. Is my concern that it might be too small for the case justified? That would be a couple of hundred quid down the drain so I'd like to be sure in advance.

 

Sorry for crashing this thread.

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"I've found a Swiss ETA 2836-2 on Ebay for 98€, however it says it has been in storage for 10 years and would require a cleaning. My watchmaker offered me to clean and regulate it for 100€. Would that be a good deal, or would it make more sense to buy a new (pre-sealed) one on CousinsUK for 250€ and mount it without cleaning or regulating it?"

 

Because I do my own cleaning/oiling I am not one to ask but many times repair guys will not completely go through a nos movement, they just clean and oil the balance jewels, escape wheel/pallet fork, and reoil the rest of the pivots..  Just sayin'.  The guy who said  "You get what you pay for"  never fooled with watches.

 

'Adjustment'...

Most nos Etas keep good time as is and 'adjustment' will consist of simple regulation.

'Technical adjustment' consists of truing/poising, the balance wheel,  checking/truing the hairspring etc but imho this is wasted effort on a movement that runs within 15 or 20 seconds a day.  Only the 'Top grade' Etas are fully adjusted and they will have higher grade balance wheels, hairsprings etc. 

The 5 or 8 second per day stuff is not for me and as for me to attempt to 'adjust' a watch...I can see no reason to chase a ghost down a dark tunnel...imho.  Otoh if a watch happens to run that close, it's fine with me.  I have a watch with a $25 Seagull ST16 that is that close.  Been that way for about 6 months (fingers crossed).

 

"Why do you think it might be necessary to remove the teeth from the gen datewheel? Shouln't there be enough clearance after removing the day wheel on the inside?"

 

Only if there is not enough room to run the various screws in and out.  I have had trouble with some DWO covering screw heads but never used a genspec 3135 calendar disc on an Eta 2836 to see how they fit.

 

A case tube is where the crown screws into right?

 

Yes.

 

"I didn't even know those were removable... do you think a gen crown might not fit on the raffles dials case tube, or is it only about the quality?"

 

It depends on quality and type.  Review the  'Crown Info'  sticky at the top of the rolex section. 

 

"Do you mean that the dial does not have to be glued at all, if the spacer and case clamps are closely fitting or do you mean that the glued feet are more likely not to break in that case?"

 

I have seen watches with dials just laying on the movement that stayed in place and have also seen glued on platform dial feet broken off.  It is always better to have some kind of adhesive or mechanical means holding the dial to the movement though.  On the 2836 there is a stamped sheet metal calendar spacer that can be glued to the dial to hold the dial in place until the whole assembly is put together.  Close fitting spacers also help a lot.  If the DWO rubs the dial you can put some equally spaced small dents in the underside of the spacer for additional clearance between the dial and DWO.

 

"And One more thing that makes me worry: The gen dials that I had in mind are 27,8 mm in diameter according to the seller, whereas the raffle dials case is fit for 28,0 mm dials as sold by them. Is my concern that it might be too small for the case justified?"

 

Two things:

1...Is the dial seat large enough to accommodate a 28.0mm dial?  'Dial seat' = the machined flat surface inside the case where the dial is mounted.

2...Will the printed outer minute track (if there is one the dial) be under the edge of the case and are printed or applied hour markers up against the edge of the case?  Not good if yes.  The dial needs to be about 1mm more or less (more is better) bigger than the dial window to hold it in place and not have any markers covered or open space between the dial and case where you can see into the case from the front side.  'Dial window' = the open space around the dial as seen from the front.

 

Once you start on the project, all this will begin to make sense as you move along.  It is a good idea to use a spare dial with the same diameter as your dial for fitting the dial/movement combo to a case to keep from scratching the dial.  I use a spare dial and movement plate with no guts in it with a calendar spacer for trial and error fitting.

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@automatico Thank you so much, that was really informative and insightful! Also thanks for pointing out that crown sticky, I see that this is a science in itself. Good to know that before purchasing anything.

 

A guy on a different forum told me that even new ETA movements require fresh oil and some regulation especially if they have been stored for a while, so I guess I will go for the bargain on Ebay. The Asian ETA 2836 movements in my replicas keep excellent time (far beyond 15 s/d) so I kinda have high expectations, but we'll see.

 

I did some research on Datejust history and it turns out that the dial I was looking at was a tritium lumed dial from the early 90s, whereas the rafflesdials case is a post 1994 model (no drilled lug holes) and the bracelet is stamped with 2001 codes (DE7 / 455 B). So I looked some more and found a beautifully aged tropical dial from 1998 and a pristine silver dial from 1999, both 27,8 mm in diameter and with superluminova to match the rafflesdials hands. I contacted rafflesdials and according to them a 27,8 mm gen dial should fit, but I'll measure it when the stuff arrives.

 

I've found a nicely aged 16200 datewheel from 1990. Not exactly true to the whole 2001 thing, but I like the font more than on the later datewheels. Furthermore I will follow your advice and order an inexpensive spare dial for fitting as well. Will normal ETA hands work or do I need ones with a longer post?

 

The more I think about it, the more it seems to make sense to glue the dial to the dial spacer, because then you can still rotate it to find the perfect fit, right? Regarding adhesives: I've read a lot about how adhesives can get soft and work their way into the movement when the watch heats up. Can you comment on that and perhaps recommend a tape that you have had good experiences with?

 

 

 

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"I will follow your advice and order an inexpensive spare dial for fitting as well."

 

I use a low cost or no cost dial from a quartz watch or anything the right diameter and thickness (usually .4mm).  A repair shop may have one or eBay for very little $$.  You can mount a dial in a Dremel tool arbor like used for cut-off discs to spin the dial and sand it down to size if it is too big.  You might have to enlarge the center hole to accept the arbor screw first.

 

"Will normal ETA hands work or do I need ones with a longer post?"

 

Regular DJ/tudor type hands to fit Eta 28xx should be fine.  The hour and minute wheels on the movement should be tall enough to give sufficient hand distance from the dial and each other.

 

"I've read a lot about how adhesives can get soft and work their way into the movement when the watch heats up. Can you comment on that and perhaps recommend a tape that you have had good experiences with?"

 

I have used two part 'slow set' epoxy and clear Gorilla glue with good results...epoxy being slightly better of the two.  Never had any trouble with epoxy or Gorilla glue 'crawling' away from where it was applied after it sets up.

Dial dots/dial strips can allow dials to crawl because the adhesive remains soft and some types will also bleed the adhesive away from where the dot/strip was applied.  Dial dots and strips are handy for cheapo quartz projects, they work fine for things like that with light weight parts and no auto winding weight flopping around.

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[mention=14711]automatico[/mention] The guy behind rafflesdials told me, that a genuine 3135 crown would not fit onto the stem of an ETA 2836-2. Can you confirm this?

Yes it will buddy. They have the same thread. Many guys do this on many Rolex reps.

 

 

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@watcher Thank you, this is good news. I will have to wait for the case to arrive then and measure the tube before I order anything, because he couldn't tell me if it was 6.0 or 5.3 mm.

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Crown needs to be a 6mm generally but I think they both share the same tube but someone can confirm that. Depending on the year style it’s either a 24-600 or 24-602 crown.


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@watcher According to automatico's "Crown info" thread it could either be a 24-600-x crown on a 24-60xx tube or a 24-603-x crown on a 24-53xx tube. Furthermore it is also possible that the case I ordered has a completely different tube spec than any Rolex.

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The rafflesdials cases come with a crown- why not just use that crown? It's a 6mm and no one's gonna say, "nice watch, but that's a fake crown".

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